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The Top Eight Mistakes People Make With Medicaid

Posted by Nina Whitehurst | May 12, 2021 | 0 Comments

Medicaid planning can be a difficult and confusing process. The following are some common mistakes people make when planning to apply for Medicaid.

  • Thinking it's too late to plan. It's almost never too late to take planning steps, even after a senior has moved to a nursing home.
  • Giving away assets too early. First, it's your money (or your house, or both). Make sure you take care of yourself first. Don't put your security at risk by putting it in the hands of your children. Precipitous transfers can cause difficult tax and Medicaid problems as well.
  • Giving away assets too late.  There does come a time when it is too late to give away assets and avoid incurring a Medicaid penalty.If you are determined to protect assets from nursing home expenses, there are better ways to do this than making outright transfers.
  • Ignoring important safe harbors created by Congress. Certain transfers are allowable without jeopardizing Medicaid eligibility. These include: transfers to disabled children, caretaker children, certain siblings and into a trust for anyone who is disabled and under age 65; a transfer to a 'pay-back' trust if under age 65; and a transfer to a pooled disability trust at any age.
  • Failing to take advantage of protections for the spouse of a nursing home resident. These protections include the purchase of an immediate annuity, petitioning for an increased community spouse resource allowance, and in some instances petitioning for an increased income allowance or refusing to cooperate with the nursing home spouse's Medicaid application. 
  • Applying for Medicaid too early. This can result in a longer ineligibility period in some instances.
  • Applying for Medicaid too late. This can mean the loss of many months of eligibility.

  • Not understanding how Medicaid affects your home. Nursing home residents do not automatically have to sell their homes in order to qualify for Medicaid, but that doesn't mean the house is completely protected. The state will likely put a lien on the house while the resident is living and attempt to recover the property after the resident has passed away.  
  • Not getting expert help. This is a complicated field that most people deal with only once in their lives. Tens of thousands of dollars are at stake. It's penny wise and pound foolish not to consult with an attorney who knows how to guide clients through the process. 
 

About the Author

Nina Whitehurst

Attorney at Law Nina has been practicing law for over 30 years in the areas of estate planning, real estate and business law She is currently licensed in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon and Tennessee. Her Martindale-Hubbell attorney rating is the highest achievable: 5 stars in peer...

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