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Caregiver Contracts: How to Pay a Family Member for Care

Posted by Nina Whitehurst | Nov 11, 2020 | 0 Comments

Caregiver Contracts: How to Pay a Family Member for Care

Although people are willing to voluntarily care for a parent or loved one without any promise of compensation, entering into a caregiver contract (also called personal service or personal care agreement) with a family member can have many benefits. It rewards the family member doing the work. It can help alleviate tension between family members by making sure the work is fairly compensated. In addition, it can be a be a key part of Medicaid planning, helping to spend down savings so that the elder might more easily be able to qualify for Medicaid long-term care coverage, if necessary.

The following are some things to keep in mind when drafting a caregiver contract:

  • Meet with your attorney. It is important to get your attorney's help in drafting the contract, especially if qualifying for Medicaid is a goal.
  • Caregiver's duties. The contract should set out the caregiver's duties, which can be anything from driving to doctor's appointments and attending doctor's meetings to grocery shopping to help with paying bills. The length of the term of the contract is usually for the elder's lifetime, so it is important to cover all possibilities, even if they are not currently needed. The contract can continue even if the elder enters a nursing home, with the caregiver acting as the elder's advocate to ensure the best possible care.
  • Payment. Payment to the caregiver can either be made with a lump-sum payment or in weekly or monthly installments. For Medicaid purposes, it is very important that the pay not be excessive. Excessive pay could be viewed as a gift for Medicaid eligibility purposes. The pay should be similar to what other caregivers in the area are making, or less. To calculate a lump-sum payment, take the monthly rate and multiply it by the elder's life expectancy. (Note that some states, Georgia for example, do not recognize the ability to create a lump sum contract based upon life expectancy.)
  • Taxes. Keep in mind that there are tax consequences. The caregiver will have to pay taxes on the income he or she receives.
  • Other sources of payment. If the elder does not have enough money to pay his or her caregiver, there may be other sources of payment. A long-term care insurance policy may cover family caregivers, for example. Also, there may be state or federal government programs that compensate family caregivers. Check with your local Agency on Aging to get more information.
 

About the Author

Nina Whitehurst

Attorney at Law Nina has been practicing law for over 30 years in the areas of estate planning, real estate and business law She is currently licensed in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon and Tennessee. Her Martindale-Hubbell attorney rating is the highest achievable: 5 stars in peer...

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