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Blended Family Can Challenge Estate Planning

Posted by Nina Whitehurst | Aug 17, 2018 | 0 Comments

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Second marriage? You've entered a brave, new world, when it comes to estate planning.

A second marriage can sometimes create a problem, because the biggest reason that stepparents and stepchildren fight is over money, according to the AARP in “Don't Split Heirs With Your Estate.”

If you and your spouse are each financially independent and leave your assets to your heirs, you'll be less likely to run into the big money issues.  However, if one spouse depends on the other for support, assets will be needed for the other spouse's lifetime. When there's a big age difference, the children of the older spouse may end up waiting 10 to 15 years for their inheritance.

The couple's first responsibility should be to their spouses. You can do this through your will, or a prenuptial or a postnuptial agreement. The goal is to make sure that the other spouse has enough money to live on. A surviving spouse does have the right to make a claim to a certain amount of the late spouse's assets, in the absence of a will or a proper prenup. However, by taking care of this in the will, you can spare each other and your blended family from the time and delay that a claim will take. The award may be large or small, depending upon the laws in your state.

One way to head off some of the anger that may follow a first spouse's death in a second or subsequent marriage, is to distribute at least a little bit of cash to all of the adult children in equal amounts. It's not about the amount, but it is a signal that you are aware of them and their needs.

In blended families with good relationships, it would be ideal for children and stepchildren to be treated equally. If there's a rational reason not to, like younger children who need college education funds, make it clear to all what the thoughts are behind the distribution.

Personal property is another source of conflict within blended families. If first-family heirlooms are claimed by second-family children, the whole family could be headed to court. Create a document that makes your wishes clear about which child should get what possessions and attach it to your will with the help of your estate planning attorney.

If you leave everything to your spouse, there's no way to be sure your own children will inherit anything. There is a chance that after your death, the ties between children and stepparents could weaken. You may need to leave money for your children in a trust that provides income to the spouse for life.

An estate planning attorney can advise you in creating an estate plan that fits your unique circumstances and may include a blended family.

Reference: AARP (July/August 2018) “Don't Split Heirs With Your Estate”

About the Author

Nina Whitehurst

Attorney at Law Nina has been practicing law for over 30 years in the areas of estate planning, real estate and business law She is currently licensed in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon and Tennessee. Her Martindale-Hubbell attorney rating is the highest achievable: 5 stars in peer...

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